Titles

From all the editions in the Theory on Demand series you can download a free pdf of the publication or decide to order the publication with one of the previously mentioned printing services.

Issue no. 1 Geert Lovink, Dynamics of Critical Internet Culture (1994–2001)
about this publication: This study examines the dynamics of critical Internet culture after the medium opened to a broader audience in the mid 1990s. It is Geert Lovink’s PhD thesis, submitted late 2002, written in between his two books on the same topic: Dark Fiber (2002) and My First Recession (2003). Publisher: Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam 2009.
ISBN: 978-90-78146-07-0.

TOD#2_coverIssue no. 2 Pit Schultz & Geert Lovink, Jugendjahre der Netzkritik: Essays zu Web 1.0
about this publication: This study examines the dynamics of critical Internet culture after the medium opened to a broader audience in the mid 1990s. It is Geert Lovink’s PhD thesis, submitted late 2002, written in between his two books on the same topic: Dark Fiber (2002) and My First Recession (2003). Publisher: Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam 2010. ISBN 978-90-816021-4-3.

TOD#3_coverIssue no. 3 Ana Peraica, Victim’s Symptoms, PTSD and Culture
about this publication: Victims’ Symptom is a collection of interviews, essays, artists’ statements and glossary definitions, which was originally launched as a Web project (http://victims.labforculture.org). Produced in 2007, the project brought together cases related to past and current sites of conflict such as Sre- brenica, Palestine, and Kosovo reporting from different (and sometimes conflicting) international viewpoints. The Victims Symptom Reader collects critical concepts in media victimology and addresses the representation of victims in economies of war. Publisher: Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam 2009. ISBN: 978-90-78146-11-7.

TOD#4 cover_voorkantIssue no. 4 Joost Smiers and Marieke van Schijndel, Imagine There Is No Copyright and Cultural Conglomorates Too...
about this publication: If we recognise that copyright is unfeasible, and unjustifiable, what should our response be? Immediately comes to mind that copyright provides an investment protection to blockbusters, best sellers and stars. It distorts cultural markets and pushes a wide variety of cultural expressions out of sight. At the same time, cultural conglomerates controlling copyright dominate cultural markets by owning the means of production, distribution, marketing and reception of cultural expressions. From the perspective of democracy and fair competition this type of market control is not to be tolerated. Thus, let us imagine what abolishing copyright would accomplish, while we do not hesitate cutting cultural conglomerates into many pieces. The result is a level playing field in which many, and many more artists can make a decent living. And even more important effect would be the restoration of our public domain of creativity and knowledge. Publisher: Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam 2009.
ISBN: 978-90-78146-09-4.

TOD#5 coverIssue no. 5 Nikos Papastergladis, Spatial Aesthetics, Art, Place and the Everyday
about this publication: This book examines the most recent shifts in contemporary art practice. By working with artists and closely observing the way in which they relate to urban space and engage other people, locally and globally, Nikos Papastergiadis provides a critical account of the transformation of art and public culture. He shows art has sought to democratise the big issues of our time and utilize new information technologies.
Spatial Aesthetics will help artists, curators and cultural workers think about the ways they intervene in public life. Challenging recent declarations in the art world that theory is obsolete, it seeks to show how art uses ideas, and how everyone can be involved in the ideas of politics and art. ISBN: 978-90-816021-3-6.

TOD6-cover_frontIssue no. 6 Tom Apperley, Gaming Rhythms: Play and Counterplay from the Situated to the Global
about this publication: Global gaming networks are heterogenous collectives of localized practices, not unified commercial products. Shifting the analysis of digital games to local specificities that build and perform the global and general, Gaming Rhythms employs ethnographic work conducted in Venezuela and Australia to account for the material experiences of actual game players. This book explores the materiality of digital play across diverse locations and argues that the dynamic relation between the everyday life of the player and the experience of digital game play can only be understood by examining play-practices in their specific situations. Publisher: Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam 2010.
ISBN: 978-90-816021-1-2.

Issue no. 7 Image, Time and Motion: New Media Critique fromTurkey, Ankara (2003 – 2010)
about this publication: This reader is a collection of essays written by Turkish graduate students between 2003 and 2010 for Andreas Treske’s seminar ‘Image, Time and Motion’ at Bilkent University in Ankara, revised and actualized in 2010. Coming from a wide range of disciplines they had studied before, very rarely media or cultural studies, these students brought in their various viewpoints and methods, and tried to integrate their observations and understandings in a seminar related to cinema and new media to discuss and sometimes just to describe the influences of digital media technologies for themselves and their colleagues. Starting from the premise that digital technology redefines our moving image culture, the authors reflect in their essays various kind of approaches and methods, experiences and practices, descriptive, critical and interdisciplinary. Publisher: Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam 2010.
ISBN: 978-90-816021-5-0.

Issue no. 8 Carolin Wiedemann & Soenke Zehle, Depletion Design: A Glossary of Network Ecologies 
about this publication: Depletion Design suggests that ideas of exhaustion cut across cultural, environmentalist, and political idioms and offers ways to explore the emergence of new material assemblages. Publisher: Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam 2012.
ISBN: 978-90-818575-1-2

 

Issue no. 9 My First Recession, Critical Internet Culture in Transition 
about this publication: My First Recession starts after the party is over. This study maps the tran- sition of critical Internet culture from the mid to late 1990s Internet craze to the dotcom crash, the subsequent meltdown of global financial markets and 9/11. Publisher: Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam 2011. ISBN: 978-90-816021-7-4.

Issue no. 10 ICT4D: New Media Research in Uganda
about this publication: this is a collection of ethnographic reports from diverse perspectives of those living at the other end of the African ICT pyramid. Conducted in 2009 by a group of five Masters in New Media (humanities) students from the University of Amsterdam under the supervision of Geert Lovink. Publisher: Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam 2011. ISBN: 978-90-816021-9-8.

Issue no. 11 Creative Networks, in the Rearview Mirror of Eastern European History
about this publication: this publication deals with Creative Networks that explore the dawn of the Internet culture in the age of network society from the perspective of Eastern Europe. From a theoretical angle the networks are introduced and interpreted as complex socio-technical systems. Publisher: Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam 2011. ISBN: 978-90-818575-0-5.