SWEET TRIBOLOGY international radio art

Sweet Tribology is a radiophonic picnic by Julia Drouhin curator. Produced by LABoral, an industrial creation and art center located in Gijon, Spain, 15th of August 2015. Two hours of sound art will be broadcast in public spaces through radios when the audience play and eat the music on chocolate records.

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I have been invited to respond to a personalized 1 minute sample of Edison wax cylinders choosen by the curator at SPAT (sound preservation association of tasmania).

SPAT is an archival music museum run by 80 years old music lovers with tonnes of radios and incredible forgotten sound devices, waiting to be activated. The new composition and other ladies sounds (max 5 minutes per track) will be printed on chocolate records and offered to the public to be listen and savored as an ephemeral installation produced by LABoral during a radiophonic picnic day.

“A number of unique picture disc 7” with sleeve, fabric pouch and a box to carry all of them will be designed by visual ladies artists. They will be played during the event from a local radio to the picnic area through radios that people can bring. LABoral will supply spare radios. Those records will be molded to create the chocolate version of it during the residency  the week before at LABoral. The chocolate records then will be played, listened through headphones and eaten by the audience in the picnic garden. This event will be part of Spectrum, (LABoratorio de sonido FM radio).

The tribology encompasses sciences of interacting surfaces in relative motion. “Sweet Tribology” insists on the fading beauty of the fragile forgotten wax cylinders objects. The chocolate record evokes this nostalgic sonic process which erase the casted sound each time the diamond reach the surface. More you play the chocolate plate, less you hear the original but then you can hear so many other sounds. And then eat the music.”

There is a crowdfunding campaign for this project cover the costs of record printing, chocolate buying and even maybe,  just maybe, pay fees to the artists who have contributed to make it possible.